Gluten Free Meyer Lemon Angel Food Cake

 

Gluten-free Angel Food Cake with Meyer Lemon Glaze - The Simple Hive

For several years, I have been eating a strict gluten-free diet.  For several years, I have been pining away over the loss of angel food cake.

Those days are over!

I finally hit on a good recipe for a gluten-free angel food cake.  It is what every angel food cake should be.  The fluffy, soft, spongy texture melts in your mouth and the Meyer lemon sauce lends a perfect amount of sweet and tart.  The blueberries are pure bliss.

Pure bliss, I say!

Because Easter is quickly approaching and this cake would make a lovely addition to your table, I’m sharing.

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Gluten-free Crepes with Meyer Lemon Cream

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No matter the question, the answer is always Meyer lemon.

For example:

Q:  What type of lemons are the most delicious?

A:  Meyer lemon

Q:  What is a good way to squeeze in some vitamin C today?

A:  Meyer lemon

Q:  What flavor do I want my crepes that I’ve been craving for two weeks to have?

You see where this is going.

My point is, Meyer lemons are always a good idea.  Always.  Forever and ever.

Amen

First, we make the gluten-free crepe batter, then the Meyer lemon cream.

Patience is a virtue, grasshopper.

For the crepes, you need:

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup milk (cow’s, soy, rice, almond, etc.)
  • 3/4 cup gluten-free flour blend*
  • 1/4 tsp. xanthan gum (if your flour blend doesn’t contain it)
  • 1 Tbsp. sugar
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 1 Tbsp. canola or sunflower oil
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract

*I’ll let you in on a secret.  I don’t know exactly what is in my gluten-free flour blend.  I’ll explain, lest you think ill of me.  Whenever I only have a little bit of gluten-free flour left in a container, I toss it in a large bin with an airtight lid.  It ends up being a blend of sorghum, millet, teff and quinoa flours with tapioca, potato and corn starches.  It might not be the best for baking when you need precise properties for the flour to magically transform into delicious baked goods, but it works well for crepes, flatbread, pancakes and as a thickener for gravy and cream sauces and soups.

I’m glad I got that off my chest.  Thank you for listening.

Add all the ingredients in a blender and process until completely smooth. You may need to scrape down the sides with a spoon or silicone spatula to fully incorporate all the flour.

Once blended, place in refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before commencing with the crepe making.  You can leave the batter refrigerated overnight if you want to speed up the process for breakfast or brunch.

Easter is this Sunday.  These would be a delicious addition to Easter brunch.  Just a suggestion.  No pressure.

While the batter is chillin’ like a villain, (assuming villains spend time in refrigerated environments.  It could happen.) make the Meyer lemon cream.

Angels just sang when I typed the words “Meyer lemon cream”.

You will need:

  • 8 oz. cream cheese, softened (inspiration struck and I couldn’t wait for the cream cheese to soften, so I microwaved it for 30 seconds.  Plan ahead.  Don’t be like me.
  • zest of one Meyer lemon
  • juice of one Meyer lemon
  • 1/2 cup sugar

DSC_0093

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix with a hand mixer until blended and fluffy.  Leave at room temperature to make spreading on the crepes easier.

Meyer lemon cream

Meyer lemon cream

Now for the crepe-making fun and festivities!

I used two different types of pans to speed up the process.  The cast iron Lodge allowed for larger crepes.  The smaller non-stick pan allowed for flipping the crepes.  I like to flip.  It makes me feel fancy.  Then I speak with a French accent and make my kids secretly hope the aren’t really related to me.  Sorry kids.  You are.

Heat whatever pan you choose over medium-high heat.  If using cast-iron, a slightly lower temp is best.

When drops of water dance across the surface of the pan, it is ready to roll.

I use a soup ladle to measure out the batter.  About half a cup is sufficient.

 

tilt pan

Pour the batter in the center of the pan and immediately begin to rotate the pan to spread the batter thinly and evenly in a larger circle.

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Cook for about 30 seconds or until the surface of the crepes loses its shine.

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Flip the crepe, either my your fancy flipping skills or with a spatula, and cook on the other side for another 30 seconds or so.

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Move crepes to a plate.  Some people layer parchment in between their crepes.  I don’t bother and I’ve never had a problem with them sticking together.  Go with your heart.

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Now for the fun part.  Take a crepe, spread with a generous amount of Meyer lemon cream and fold over.  Dust with powdered sugar, if you so desire.

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Then, eat daintily like a lady or gentleman, using the proper fork and dabbing your mouth gently with a napkin.

Who are we kidding?

DSC_0145

Dig in!

 

 

 

Gluten Free Crepes with Meyer Lemon Cream

Gluten-free crepes with Meyer lemon cream. #glutenfree - The Simple Hive

No matter the question, the answer is always Meyer lemon.

For example:

Q:  What type of lemons are the most delicious?

A:  Meyer lemon

Q:  What is a good way to squeeze in some vitamin C today?

A:  Meyer lemon

Q:  What flavor do I want my crepes that I’ve been craving for two weeks to have?

You see where this is going.

My point is, Meyer lemons are always a good idea.  Always.  Forever and ever.

Amen

First, we make the gluten-free crepe batter, then the Meyer lemon cream.

Patience is a virtue, grasshopper.

For the crepes, you need:

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup milk (cow’s, soy, rice, almond, etc.)
  • 3/4 cup gluten-free flour blend*
  • 1/4 tsp. xanthan gum (if your flour blend doesn’t contain it)
  • 1 Tbsp. sugar
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 1 Tbsp. canola or sunflower oil
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract

*I’ll let you in on a secret.  I don’t know exactly what is in my gluten-free flour blend.  I’ll explain, lest you think ill of me.  Whenever I only have a little bit of gluten-free flour left in a container, I toss it in a large bin with an airtight lid.  It ends up being a blend of sorghum, millet, teff and quinoa flours with tapioca, potato and corn starches.  It might not be the best for baking when you need precise properties for the flour to magically transform into delicious baked goods, but it works well for crepes, flatbread, pancakes and as a thickener for gravy and cream sauces and soups.

I’m glad I got that off my chest.  Thank you for listening.

Add all the ingredients in a blender and process until completely smooth. You may need to scrape down the sides with a spoon or silicone spatula to fully incorporate all the flour.

Once blended, place in refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before commencing with the crepe making.  You can leave the batter refrigerated overnight if you want to speed up the process for breakfast or brunch.

Easter is this Sunday.  These would be a delicious addition to Easter brunch.  Just a suggestion.  No pressure.

While the batter is chillin’ like a villain, (assuming villains spend time in refrigerated environments.  It could happen.) make the Meyer lemon cream.

Angels just sang when I typed the words “Meyer lemon cream”.

Gluten Free Crepes with Meyer Lemon Cream

You will need:

  • 8 oz. cream cheese, softened (inspiration struck and I couldn’t wait for the cream cheese to soften, so I microwaved it for 30 seconds.  Plan ahead.  Don’t be like me.
  • zest of one Meyer lemon
  • juice of one Meyer lemon
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Gluten free crepes with Meyer lemon cream - The Simple Hive

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix with a hand mixer until blended and fluffy.  Leave at room temperature to make spreading on the crepes easier.

Meyer lemon cream - the simple hive

Meyer lemon cream

Now for the crepe-making fun and festivities!

I used two different types of pans to speed up the process.  The cast iron Lodge allowed for larger crepes.  The smaller non-stick pan allowed for flipping the crepes.  I like to flip.  It makes me feel fancy.  Then I speak with a French accent and make my kids secretly hope the aren’t really related to me.  Sorry kids.  You are.

Heat whatever pan you choose over medium-high heat.  If using cast-iron, a slightly lower temp is best.

When drops of water dance across the surface of the pan, it is ready to roll.

I use a soup ladle to measure out the batter.  About half a cup is sufficient.

 

gluten free crepes - the simple hive

Pour the batter in the center of the pan and immediately begin to rotate the pan to spread the batter thinly and evenly in a larger circle.

gluten free crepes - the simple hive

Cook for about 30 seconds or until the surface of the crepes loses its shine.

gluten free crepes - the simple hive

Flip the crepe, either my your fancy flipping skills or with a spatula, and cook on the other side for another 30 seconds or so.

gluten free crepes - the simple hive

Move crepes to a plate.  Some people layer parchment in between their crepes.  I don’t bother and I’ve never had a problem with them sticking together.  Go with your heart.

gluten-free crepes with meyer lemon cream - the simple hive

Now for the fun part.  Take a crepe, spread with a generous amount of Meyer lemon cream and fold over.  Dust with powdered sugar, if you so desire.

easy gluten free crepes - the simple hive

Then, eat daintily like a lady or gentleman, using the proper fork and dabbing your mouth gently with a napkin.

Who are we kidding?

Gluten-free crepes with Meyer lemon cream #glutenfree - the simple hive

Dig in!

 

 

 

simple sweets for your valentine

Five years ago, before baby honeybee was born, I made some treats for my husband to take to his work and share with his co-workers. That was back in the days, before homeschooling, when I had time for crazy activities like baking for fun. They were a hit, because, let’s be honest, who doesn’t like chocolate?

They look like I spent all day in the kitchen, but I didn’t. I’ll take you on a photo tour and tell you how I made these so you can, too. When you present these to your loved ones, feel free to be dramatic about spending your precious time to make them happy because you love them so muuuuuch. Go ahead. I won’t tell.

Warning:  The photos in this post are terrible!  They were taken using an old point-and-shoot.  I now have a decent camera, but I cannot guarantee that future pictures will be any better.  Please don’t hold it against me.

The first thing you need to do before you can decorate the cake is to bake a cake. I’m sure you figured that one out. So grab your favorite boxed cake mix and bake as directed. Your secret is safe with me. Alternately, you can bake your favorite cake from scratch. Do whichever you want. I’m flexible.

heart shaped mini cake

heart shaped mini cake

To make this heart shaped cake, I used a strawberry boxed cake mix, ahem, and used a large heart-shaped cookie cutter to cut hearts for two layers. Hidden between the layers is a whipped ganache. Then I drenched the whole thing with velvety chocolate ganache and smoothed the edges with an offset spatula. A strawberry dipped in ganache adorns the top. See? Easy!

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For the heart shaped cake topped with 3 truffles, I used chocolate cake.  I used the cooled, leftover ganache for the truffles.  To make the truffles, simply roll the ganache  into balls and then roll around in cocoa powder.  A little whipped ganache in a pastry bag and piped around the bottom edge dresses it up a bit.

Do you see a ganache theme here? This is the recipe I used:

In a saucepan, heat 1 part cream to 3 parts good-quality dark chocolate over medium-low heat. When the chocolate is melted and completely incorporated with the cream, it’s ready.  If you remember nothing else I say, remember this:  Do not walk away from the stove.  If you do, the cream will betray you and will suddenly decide to boil and you will have a scorched, chocolaty mess on your hands.  I know you don’t really know me, but trust me on this.

While still warm and liquid, ganache can be easily poured over a cake for a smooth, shiny glaze. If you let it cool to room temperature, it becomes spreadable for fillings and frostings. Refrigerated ganache can be whipped for fillings and for forming truffles. Ganache is simple and versatile and that’s why I love it so.

baby cake with chocolate buttercream frosting

baby cake with chocolate buttercream frosting

This cake was make using 2 small round cake pans.  This time I made a chocolate cake from a boxed mix.  Don’t hate, appreciate.  I used chocolate buttercream for the filling and the frosting, then piped a simple edge with a pastry bag and star tip.  I’m fun that way.

all dressed up and ready to go

all dressed up and ready to go

What do you do with all the scraps of cake leftover from cutting heart shapes, you ask?

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You can do what I did and toss them in a mug, pour on the ganache, baby, and top with whipped cream!  My kids still remind me of how much they enjoyed these with hopes that I’ll make them again.  I’m not taking the hint.

If you’re making these treats for your family, they will love you forever, have the impression you have some mad baking skills and will hold you to higher expectations.  You’ve been warned.